S. Caecilii Cypriani Opera Recognita & Illustrata a Joanne Fello, Oxoniensi episcopo. Accedunt Annales Cyprianici, sive, Tredecim annorum, quibus S. Cyprianus inter Christianos versatus est, brevis historia chronologice delineata a Joanne Pearsonio, Cestriensi episcopo. Editio tertia cui additae sunt dissertationes Cyprianicae Henrici Dodwelli.


// Tall quarto. [8], 20, [48], 58, 280, 277-334, 222, [2], 177, [1] pp. Engraved illustration on title of the Sheldonian Theater, full-page engraved plate (facing p.1 [sometimes called the frontispiece]) showing the execution by decapitation of Cyprian. Original full blind-stamped vellum, black manuscript spine title; joints splitting, head and tail of spine chipped or missing, untouched. Good +. The text is comprised the Saint Cyprian's collected works. It is copiously annotated by John Fell, with a life of Cyprian compiled by John Pearson (1613-1686). John Fell (1625-1686) supplied copious notes. The book represents the greatest of Fell's contributions to patriotic scholarship and the exposition of the position of the Anglican Church. – Stanley Morison, John Fell, the University Press and the 'Fell' Types, pp. 48-9. Henry Dodwell's Dissertationes Cyprianicae previously appeared separately in 1684, but reprinted in 1690. The martyrdom of Cyprian is of vital importance in Christian history. He was the first Christian martyr of the African continent who was imprisoned and beheaded by the sword in 258 A.D. for refusing sacrifice to pagan deities. "Gallus's successor, the emperor Valerian, was at first sympathetic to the Christians, and for several years the Church enjoyed relative tranquility. It was during this time that St. Cyprian wrote a number of treatises which reflect his timeless and practical pastoral concerns: "On the Advantage of Patience," "On Works and Alms," "On Jealousy and Envy," and "On Virginity." But a member of Valerian's court, the evilly ambitious Macrian, persuaded the emperor that the Christians were dangerous rivals and that their loyalty to the Church threatened the unity of the empire. The resulting persecution was directed primarily at the leaders of the Church, and in 257 Saint Cyprian was exiled to Curibis. There he had a vision, indicating that a year later he would be martyred. And indeed, just a year later Cyprian was brought to trial. From the recorded court proceedings, it is evident that he impressed all by his wonderful scorn of suffering. When the proconsul announced the death sentence, many of his flock, who had risked their lives to come for a final blessing, cried out, "Let us die with him!" Cyprian was beheaded on September 14, 258, becoming the first hieromartyr of the Church of Carthage. The Christians reverently buried his holy remains, which, in the reign of Charlemagne, were taken to France. We tend to think that the lives of martyrs, while inspiring, are not particularly relevant to us. In fact, martyrdom is the very essence of the Christian life. Whether or not we think the coming of Antichrist and the persecution of Christians is imminent, we would do well to heed the exhortations of Saint Cyprian and practice the martyrs' marvelous and soul-saving detachment from this world that we too might bravely welcome death and with confidence cry out with the Seer of Mysteries, "Come, Lord Jesus!" – "Saint Cyprian of Carthage Inspiration of Martyrs" [web-page]. Cyprian described a plague that raged from 250 and went on for at least twenty years. "In 250 to 266, at the height of the outbreak, 5,000 people a day were said to be dying in Rome... Cyprian drew moralizing analogies in his sermons to the Christian community and drew a word picture of the plague's symptoms in his essay De mortalitate ("On the Plague"):" [Wikipedia]. De mortalitate is found starting on page 110[-116] in the first book of Annales. "This trial, that now the bowels, relaxed into a constant flux, discharge the bodily strength; that a fire originated in the marrow ferments into wounds of the fauces; that the intestines are shaken with a continual vomiting; that the eyes are on fire with the injected blood; that in some cases the feet or some parts of the limbs are taken off by the contagion of diseased putrefaction; that from the weakness arising by the maiming and loss of the body, either the gait is enfeebled, or the hearing is obstructed, or the sight darkened;—is profitable as a proof of faith. What a grandeur of spirit it is to struggle with all the powers of an unshaken mind against so many onsets of devastation and death! what sublimity, to stand erect amid the desolation of the human race, and not to lie prostrate with those who have no hope in God; but rather to rejoice, and to embrace the benefit of the occasion; that in thus bravely showing forth our faith, and by suffering endured, going forward to Christ by the narrow way that Christ trod, we may receive the reward of His life and faith according to His own judgment!" - Cyprian, De Mortalitate, Translated by Ernest Wallis, 1885. Brunet II, p.459; Sir William Smith, Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1850, vol. 1, p. 912-915.

Title: S. Caecilii Cypriani Opera Recognita & Illustrata a Joanne Fello, Oxoniensi episcopo. Accedunt Annales Cyprianici, sive, Tredecim annorum, quibus S. Cyprianus inter Christianos versatus est, brevis historia chronologice delineata a Joanne Pearsonio, Cestriensi episcopo. Editio tertia cui additae sunt dissertationes Cyprianicae Henrici Dodwelli.

Author Name: CYPRIAN, Saint, Bishop of Carthage [Thascius Caecilius Cyprianus] )(200-258 A.D.).

Categories: Religion,

Publisher: Amstelodami,, apud Joannem Ludovicum de Lorme, 1700.: 1700

lbs: 3.00 lbs

Seller ID: LV1769

Keywords: Religion